Health and safety

We have an excellent safety record on our bottle school trips. With our experience of Guatemala, we have put many measures in place to safeguard the health of participants on bottle school trips. It’s important that you follow some simple steps too, as outlined below, as you will be in a very different environment to what you are used to.

The information provided here is basic information to take into consideration for your health and safety.  You should research and consult with YOUR doctor to ensure YOUR health safety within the parameters of what you are comfortable with.  Your medical insurance health coverage in and out of your home country is a matter that should be looked into before your trip begins.

Vaccinations

There are various recommendations on vaccinations to get before traveling abroad.

Please do not ask us what vaccinations you “should” get, as this is a personal choice that you will have to make, in consultation with your physician. Serve The World Today is unable to give advice on which vaccinations you should or shouldn’t get, as there is no “right” answer. We are not trained medical professionals, and for reasons of liability we cannot give any more advice than there is in this document.

Very few visitors to Guatemala choose to get vaccinated against rabies or malaria, and many choose not to get any vaccinations at all. Others choose to get every vaccination available to them. It is entirely up to you what you feel comfortable with.

One place to go for information is the Center for Disease Control’s web site: See Information about Guatemala on the CDC web site.

Having read the CDC web site, you should consult your doctor or visit your local travel clinic for a consultation before making any decisions about what vaccinations to get. To find a travel clinic near you visit the CDC: Travel Clinics webpage.

We also suggest that do your own research (such as Google searches) before making decisions on getting any vaccinations.

 


International Travel Health Notices

For the latest health information and warnings for countries around the world visit one of the following websites:

CDC: Travel Notices webpage

CDC: Information about Guatemala

US State Department: Country Specific Information

Food and Water

  • Be aware of your water
    • Don’t drink the tap water. We provide bottled water and bottled water will always be available wherever you are.
    • Use bottled water when you brush your teeth, and keep your mouth closed in the shower.
  • Only eat the food that we provide you, plus any packaged snacks that you bring with you.
    • In Antigua we eat at a trusted restaurant; in the communities we have a private chef, Christy, who trained in food science in the US.
    • Don’t buy food off the street, however tempting it looks
    • If a child offers you candy, you can take it so as not to appear rude or ungrateful, but don’t eat it – you don’t know where their hands have been.
  • Keep your hands clean by washing with soap often or using hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol).
    • Before eating
    • After using the bathroom
    • After coughing or sneezing
  • Bring snacks. It may be a good idea to pack snacks from home such as granola bars, peanut butter, power bars as an option in case local food disagrees with you. You’ll also be working hard on the bottle school, so you may need snacks outside of mealtimes!
  • Stay hydrated
    • Carry a bottle of water around with you everywhere you go.  This is a great preventative measure for heat stroke, dizziness, fatigue or heat exhaustion, and dehydration.
    • You should drink enough to maintain the same urination frequency you have at home.
    • Remember as you age your thirst reflex begins to decline so don’t solely rely on that feeling for when to hydrate
    • As a minimum you should be drinking 6 pints of water per day. 8 pints or more is fine and necessary in certain climates. Remember that coffee, tea and alcohol cause your body to lose water; if drinking these drinks you will need to drink more water.
  • Wear sun screen.
  • Get plenty of rest and wear earplugs when you sleep.
  • Use insect repellant if mosquitoes are prevalent

Safety

  • Guatemala may be perceived as a “dangerous” country, but most parts of the country are not dangerous at all. Antigua is a popular tourist destination and is very safe. San Martin Jilotepeque is very remote and does not see many tourists; you will be welcomed as honored guest or even like a family member.
  • Please note, however, that petty crime has been on the rise in Antigua recently (late 2013). Please stay aware, and please stay with the group at all times. Be especially careful when getting money out from your purse or pocket, and be careful with your iPhone or camera – don’t have it visible and accessible, such as in your back pocket.
  • Always follow the instructions of your tour guide and group leader, as they are familiar with the many ways to ensure you have a pleasant experience.
  • Always communicate specific desires and requests to your group leader and they will always do their best to accommodate you, if they can without disrupting plans for the entire group.
  • Do not handle or pet animals so as to avoid bites, particularly dogs and cats
    • If you are bitten, wash the area immediately with soap and water, and seek medical attention straight away

Money and valuables

  • All the trips costs are included in the $1,195 price of the trip. You will only need a small amount of cash with you for souvenirs and tips. Guatemala has a lot of beautiful fabrics and handicrafts – most people end up buying a lot! $200 to $300 is generally a good amount of cash to bring.
  • Your valuables will be safe at the hotel, or in the community. There is always a safe place to store valuables while we are working on the bottle school.